Tag: freestyle

RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK: BRAND NEW LOCATION!

The Hip-Hop Culture Center and Freestyle Mondays present the RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK!

Once a week, the Hip-Hop Culture Center will be bringing you the best in freestyle rap competitions from Freestyle Mondays’ Off-The-Head Gameshow Battle at its NEW LOCATION at Ella Lounge!

But this isn’t your average rap battle. With a spinning wheel AND a plinko (Plink, Yo!) board determining what the topic is, MCs will have to stay on-topic as they come of the top!

In honor of the new location, we’re giving you a special TRIPLE SHOT of battles this week!

First, we kick things off with a first-round battle in the first battle at the new location with the 47% taking on the 53% as Rabbi Darkside takes on PremRock!

That same night things heated up in the C-Block round as Chaz Kangas and B.S. attempted to cockblock each other in rhyme form over the love of a female!

As as another special BONUS BATTLE we have the LAST BATTLE AT OUR OLD LOCATION EVER as LEX RUSH took on the mysterious EL GATO in the No-Rules No-Writtens Round in the FINALS of the August 2012 Championship!

Stay tuned to H2C2 for more battles and be sure to check out the Freestyle Mondays Off-the-Head Gameshow Battle the FIRST MONDAY of EVERY MONTH at our NEW LOCATION at ELLA LOUNGE at 9 Avenue A!

Don’t forget to LIKE us on Facebook!

RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK: Benny Els vs. Baba!

The Hip-Hop Culture Center and Freestyle Mondays present the RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK!

Once a week, the Hip-Hop Culture Center will be bringing you the best in freestyle rap competitions from Freestyle Mondays’ Off-The-Head Gameshow Battle at 116 Macdougal!

But this isn’t your average rap battle. With a spinning wheel AND a plinko (Plink, Yo!) board determining what the topic is, MCs will have to stay on-topic as they come of the top!

This week, we come down to the final round of April’s Off-the-Head Gameshow Battle Championship! After a grueling one night tournament of some of the most challenging freestyle themes, it comes down to Benny Els and Baba in the finals! Each MC gets two 30 second rounds, so you can expect lots of freestyle responses and white-knuckle MC action to crown the first holder of the official Freestyle Mondays Championship Belt!

…and as an added BONUS this week (since our battle last week was preempted due to our EXCLUSIVE interview with MALCOLM SMITH – the NEW YORK SENATOR who DEMANDED LIL WAYNE APOLOGIZE for DISSING NEW YORK) here’s a BONUS BATTLE from last August that pit BENNY ELS against SARAH TONIN as GABBY DOUGLAS vs. MICHAEL PHELPS!

Benny Els’ Music can be heard at http://soundcloud.com/bennyels

Stay tuned to H2C2 for more battles and be sure to check out the Freestyle Mondays Off-the-Head Gameshow Battle the FIRST MONDAY of EVERY MONTH and coming to a new location soon!

Don’t forget to LIKE us on Facebook!

RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK: Lil Kim vs. Kim Jong-il

The Hip-Hop Culture Center and Freestyle Mondays present the RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK!

Once a week, the Hip-Hop Culture Center will be bringing you the best in freestyle rap competitions from Freestyle Mondays’ Off-The-Head Gameshow Battle at 116 Macdougal!

But this isn’t your average rap battle. With a spinning wheel AND a plinko (Plink, Yo!) board determining what the topic is, MCs will have to stay on-topic as they come of the top!

This week, we landed on the Superstar round, assigning each MC to rap from the perspective of a worldwide superstar for lyrical dominance. Cold Stone Steve Awesome (AKA Stack That Paper) got the guise of Kim Jong-il whereas Chaz Kangas represents Lil Kim!


COLD STONE STEVE AWESOME VS. CHAZ KANGAS
KIM JONG-IL VS. LIL KIM

Chaz Kangas’ music can be found at http://chazkangas.bandcamp.com

Stay tuned to H2C2 for more battles and be sure to check out the Freestyle Mondays Off-the-Head Gameshow Battle the FIRST MONDAY of EVERY MONTH at 116 MacDougal in Manhattan!

Don’t forget to LIKE us on Facebook!

The Hip-Hop Culture Center and Freestyle Mondays present the RAP BATTLE OF THE WEEK!

Once a week, the Hip-Hop Culture Center will be bringing you the best in freestyle rap competitions from Freestyle Mondays’ Off-The-Head Gameshow Battle at 116 Macdougal!

But this isn’t your average rap battle. With a spinning wheel AND a plinko (Plink, Yo!) board determining what the topic is, MCs will have to stay on-topic as they come of the top!

This week, we landed on the C-Block Round. Here, a lovely lady is chosen from the audience and each MC has to convince her why they’re so much better for her than their opponent, effectively c-blocking them!


PREMROCK VS. MATRIXX
C-BLOCK ROUND

PremRock’s music is available online at http://premrockandwilliegreen.bandcamp.com/

Stay tuned to H2C2 for more battles and be sure to check out the Freestyle Mondays Off-the-Head Gameshow Battle the FIRST MONDAY of EVERY MONTH at 116 MacDougal in Manhattan!

Don’t forget to LIKE us on Facebook!

As seen on NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” as well as in some of the best received rap battle on the planet, Jus Daze has been making waves throughout the rap game. We had the chance to sit down with Jus Daze and discuss his new mixtape, life as a battle MC, and much more!

Let’s start with the name ‘Jus Daze,’ what does it mean to you and how did you get it?

Daze is a play off my actual name, which I made for myself in the 3rd grade and it just carried through my entire life. The “Jus” part was added accidentally because of my screen name and email address at the time “JusDaze”. I couldn’t have “Daze” as my screen name and I didn’t want numbers at the end of my email address (I always hated that) so I wrote Jus, as in “just” Daze!

You were born in Brooklyn, but currently reside in Queens. Do you feel your music has more in common with Queens-born MCs?

To limit myself to one area musically OR demographically would be foolish. I think my style is born more from the sounds of music genres that have meshed with not only hip hop, but world sounds. I grew up with my mother playing a lot of soft-rock based artists like Rod Stewart, Phil Collins, some soul like Luther Vandross, The Isleys, and my aunt playing lots of Doo-wop, Sinatra, and oldies. To say whether or not I relate more to the sounds of a “Queens-born MC” is tough. Some might categorize my music as “lyrical” or “music with meaning”, which pinpoints a lot of “Queens-born” authentic MC styles, but I like to think of myself as artist who doesn’t necessarily fit the category of any particular TYPE of characteristic. I could kill an MC lyrically, make love to a woman, thank my mother for her blessings, and express inner emotions all through my music, so if that’s what being a “Queen-born MC” does, then sure, I’m a “Queens-born MC”, otherwise I’m whatever that category of rapper is!

What was your first exposure to hip-hop?

My first exposure to hip-hop was probably being born in New York! Whenever this question is asked I usually don’t know how to answer because I feel like I was born with hip-hop in my heart. I don’t know how I started, why I started, but I ALWAYS remember rapping. I guess I’d say my first exposure to Hip Hop was seeing so much of the lifestyle surrounding where I lived. I grew up in East New York near Highland Park where there were a lot of gang activities going on at the time, but also a lot of Boombox Boom Bap radio playing, live MC’ing at block parties, and of course “Video Music Box” on TV. The first performer to ever make me go WOW was Michael Jackson. His stage charisma was amazing. He sang and danced almost effortlessly, or at least made it seem like it was and that impressed me. I also seen LL Cool J’s “Momma Said Knock You Out” video and was very impressed as well. I guess being exposed to Hip Hop around my neighborhood, among my friends, at school, and through the media made me take my initial interest, which nowadays has become my lifestyle.

A good amount of your listeners likely discovered you through your rap battles. How did you first get involved with Grind Time and the NYC battle circuit?

I actually stumbled upon Grind Time battles at work (it’s ok I don’t work at that spot anymore!) I remember watching Smack DVDs from back in the day ,watching the classic Mook vs Serius Jones battles and others, plus over the years I partook in a lot of on-the-spot random freestyle battles myself. When I first saw Grind Time I thought wow these dudes are incredible (initially, I thought it was all freestyling). But as everything does with time, it was a written format which evolved from the on the spot random battles most New Yorkers/hip-hoppers are accustomed to. I watched, I saw an opportunity to get involved and seized it! I battled Upstate for my first Grindtime battle, the footage never saw the light of the day, but I won by a landslide and that resulted in me making the league that day. I battled two weeks afterwards against Paranormal, which was my first on-cam battle and since then, my resume speaks for itself. I’ve won EOW MC Challenges, Rhyme Calisthenics, Anthony Anderson’s Mixtape Comedy Freestyle battle, and other MC based challenges, most of which there is no prior preparation, but as an “MC” you should be able to Master any Ceremony you’re placed in. MC’s and rappers are two different things in my opinion, but that’s a whole other topic.

Last year you released your debut album Common Law. Did it present a challenge to get in the album-crafting mindset while you were still active on the battle circuit?

The album was being worked on before I started battling, which is why I really got into the whole battle circuit to begin with. Making music has always been the main focus for me, personally, but little did I know what challenges would face me trying to do both congruently. Did it present a challenge? Oh yeah, definitely. Working on music and battling (in the written format) are like speaking two different languages simultaneously in the same sentence at the same time! Battling helped the success of my album to receive the amount of downloads, media exposure, celebrity and worldwide recognition it’s gotten, but it was A LOT of hard work. Finding time to write, memorize, record, perform, & battle…ALL WHILE WORKING a regular 9 to 5 is no easy task. I’ve always said that when there’s a passion for something you love, you don’t find the time, you MAKE the time for it. This was no different in juggling what it takes to get an album recorded, mixed, mastered, distributed (which I myself did) and seen by the masses. But, as any challenge does once you overcome it, it makes you have an even stronger mindset and smarter outlook going into the next endeavor, if you choose to. Since then, major opportunities have come up and even bigger and better things have happened because I know how to move a little bit smarter and the “do and do not’s” of what it takes.

What made you decide on the album title Common Law?

My marriage to hip-hop. I’ve won numerous talent competitions, rap battles, gained and lost for the love this culture and music. No matter what, I’m unofficially married to it. My dedication and devotion goes into my work and from the responses I get, I think the fans see. I appreciate their comments and feedback more than I can even express!

You recently battled on NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” what was the experience making the leap into network TV like?

Crazy! The amount of exposure and recognition I got after winning the “Ready Set Flow” challenge was incredible. Network television is the market to go into if you’re trying to be seen and heard! Obviously it’s opened opportunities, it’s gotten me seen by people who regularly might have not seen me. It’s also had a nice amount of people who never payed any attention to you jump on the bandwagon, which is to be expected with any gaining of popularity or fame, but I’ll tell you this…the inner workings of what goes on behind a television show is not that much different than what goes into planning, hosting, and executing a major battle/hip hop event. I’ll leave it at that, but the underground and mainstream are not that far apart structurally.

Most recently, you put out the King of Queens mixtape, which includes a lot of your best freestyles from the past year. With all that you’ve done in the past 12 months, do you feel your approach to MCing in the booth or on-stage has changed much?

Hell yeah. I feel like I’m being more of myself now because the impression of “Who the hell is Daze?” doesn’t have to be met. People now know my personality, my thoughts, my life and who I am a little bit better so it allows me to be more comfortable and express more of what I want to in the booth. Like I said before, I’m blessed with the feedback and response I get from the fans. When fans come out to shows they show me nothing but love and support what it is I’m doing. If I keep moving the way I’m moving, I think I might be alright with this hip-hop stuff for a while!

If you had to pick a favorite battle that you were in, and a favorite battle you enjoyed as a fan, which would they be?

My favorite battle is probably me vs C4. The audio & visual are really good in it. Either that, or me vs D’Meitz. But the mainstream culture may not get what is and isn’t “battle etiquette”. I’d say to Google anything I’ve done. I’m pretty much satisfied with all my work. I wouldn’t put my efforts into anything if I wasn’t giving it my all or my best. As far as a battle I’ve enjoyed, one of my favorite battles of all time is Serius Jones vs Jin, it’s the true definition of what a “bodybag” (a term the battle community uses for a clear victory) is.

Check out more of Jus Daze’s music at http://www.jusdaze.com/ and be sure to follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jusdaze !

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A Message To All Rapathon Veterans

Greetings,

I hope you guys are getting your bars together. There should be lyrical lines competing with each other in your brain. You should be in your mirror recanting 16 after 16 after 16 like water. Your written, freestyle and frittens should be receiving a rhyming  work out on the daily. You should be pounding out punch lines, scanning your rhyme book, and getting your breathing on point.

Other disciplines have the Super Bowl, the Finals, the Championship. We, high caliber emcee’s who like to rock with other individuals of our species have the Rapathon. The only event of it’s kind, on the planet Earth, for people gifted in the art of Yes, Yes, Yall.

So here’s the deal. All returning Veterans please email a photo of yourself ASAP to hiphopculturectr [at] gmail.com. In addition please post Rapathon information example (posters, audition dates, updates on your social networking hookups. (Facebook, Twitter, Myspace etc…) We need to let the world know that Rapathon 5 is coming up and that you are starring in it. Note, all participants must come to at least one of the audition/rehearsal dates. They are…

May 3rd 6:30-8:30PM
May 10th 6:30-8:30PM
May 12th 6:30-8;30PM
May 14th 2:00-4:00PM
May 17th 6:30-8:30PM
May 19th 6:30-8:30PM

So in closing let’s end with the words that all H2C2 alumni know so well  “Rock,You Don’t Stop…Keep on…You Don’t Stop!”

The Hip Hop Culture Center in Harlem announces Rapathon 5!The Rapathon is back celebrating it’s fifth anniversery! Five years long, five years strong this will be the best one yet. We’re currently looking for the Best of the Best Emcees’ to participate in this years event. So if you think you’re Rap-A-Thon material, auditions will be held on the following dates:

May 3rd 6:30-8;30PM
May 10th 6:30-8:30PM
May 12th 6:30-8;30PM
May 14th 2:00-4:00PM
May 17th 6:30-8:30PM
May 19th 6:30-8:30PM

If you can spit fire for 90 seconds straight without cursing, you just might have what it takes! So if your a new Emcee or a true Emcee, maybe you can come out and make history as part of Rap-A-Thon 5. We’ll see you at the Center:

2309 Frederick Douglass Blvd.
(at the Magic Johnson Theater)
New York, NY 10027
(212) 234-7171

Spread the word! Blog it. Tweet it. Get it out there!

Get Ready for Rapathon 5!

The Hip Hop Culture Center in Harlem announces Rapathon 5!It’s hard to believe that it’s been five years since the Hip Hop Culture Center birthed the 24-hour Annual Rapathon. When introduced to the masses back in May 2006, this historic event took the Hip Hop world (particularly the underground) by storm!

Comprised of the some of the best lyrical emcees in the Tri-State area, the Rapathon has proven to be one of Hip Hop’s must see events of the year.

Not only do we celebrate the culture of Hip Hop through positive non-stop freestyle, we share a camaraderie that lasts far beyond the famous Rapathon countdown.

The Hip Hop Culture Center is honored and thrilled to announce that we will be hosting the 5th Annual Rapathon; Saturday, May 21st 2011 through Sunday, May 22nd 2011.

H2C2 has managed to feature over 150+ rappers, 30+ DJs, beat boxers, and musicians from all over the world. This year will be no different from any other, expect an additional hour on the clock totaling 28 hours of straight Hip Hop! We will hold 4 to 6 open auditions at our venue for those interested in performing. To take part in this staple event you must be able to rhyme for 90 seconds straight without cursing, commit to the show, and interact well with others. Just show up with an undeniable rhyme and you might be the next emcee to grace the famous Rapathon stage. Be prepared for an unforgettable experience because H2C2 has a lot in store. For more info stay tuned to our website www.h2c2harlem.com.

H2C2 not only provides exclusive shows for the community but also prides itself on its educational involvement. Using Hip Hop as an instrument to educate the youth the Hip Hop Culture Center offers a program called Edutainment. This workshop combines the latest Hip Hop tunes with academics covering subjects from Civil Rights to Financial Literacy.

We are located at 2309 Frederick Douglass Blvd., 2nd Floor of the Magic Johnson Theater in the heart of Harlem, along 125th Street shopping district. We are accessible by A, B, C, D, 2 and 3 trains. For more information pertaining to the 5th Annual Rapathon, please contact us at 212-234-7171 or hiphopculturectr@gmail.com.